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The latest articles and news from Health Insurance.org

  • Short-term health insurance in Iowa October 20, 2018 5:03 am
    Iowa does not currently have state-specific restrictions for short-term health insurance plans, so the state defaults to the federal regulations. But Iowa Insurance Comissioner, Doug Ommen, has indicated that the state is considering regulations to ensure that short-term plans provide comprehensive ("fulsome") coverage and allow at least one guaranteed renewal.
    Steve Anderson
  • Health Wonk Review for October 18, 2018 October 19, 2018 9:08 pm
    "They're creepy and they're kooky ... Mysterious and spooky ... They're all together ooky ..." They're the spine-chilling collection of posts in the Halloween Edition of Health Wonk Review over at Managed Care Matters.
    Steve Anderson
  • Short-term health insurance in Colorado October 18, 2018 11:04 pm
    Colorado has its own regulations pertaining to short-term health insurance. Short-term plan terms can’t last more than six months in Colorado, and cannot be renewable.
    Steve Anderson
  • Short-term health insurance in the District of Columbia October 18, 2018 5:10 am
    Because DC does not limit short-term plans, the Trump Administration’s new regulations will apply in the District. Insurers will be allowed to offer short-term plans with initial terms up to 364 days and the option to renew for a total duration of up to 36 months.
    Steve Anderson
  • Texas and the ACA’s Medicaid expansion October 15, 2018 2:40 pm
    Texas has not expanded Medicaid under the ACA. And they also have the most stringent eligibility guidelines in the country for non-disabled adults. As a result, Texas has the biggest coverage gap in the country, with at least 623,000 residents — and possibly as many as 1 million — ineligible for Medicaid and also ineligible for premium subsidies to offset the cost of private coverage in the exchange.
    Michael Rickard
  • Short-term health insurance in Connecticut October 15, 2018 1:57 pm
    Connecticut is one of the states that places strict regulations on short-term health insurance plans. Connecticut's Insurance Commissioner, Katharine Wade, has noted that "Connecticut already has the necessary statutory consumer protections in place to prohibit ‘junk plans.' "
    Steve Anderson
  • DC health insurance marketplace: history and news of the state’s exchange October 15, 2018 11:10 am
    DC has by far the lowest percentage of subsidy-eligible exchange enrollees in the country. This is likely due to a combination of the fact that there is no off-exchange market in the District, the median household income is among the highest in the country, and Medicaid eligibility is quite generous (so lower-income applicants who would get subsidized QHPs in other states are eligible for Medicaid instead in DC). DC's exchange has approved an individual mandate for the District, to be implemented in 2019 if the DC Council approves it.
    Louise Norris
  • Tennessee health insurance October 15, 2018 6:40 am
    A guide to healthcare, health insurance, Medicaid and Medicare in Tennessee, including ACA updates and a free health insurance quote.
    Michael Rickard
  • California health insurance marketplace: history and news of the state’s exchange October 15, 2018 6:02 am
    Covered CA is one of ten state-run exchanges that has an "active purchaser" model, meaning that they negotiate directly with carriers to make sure that rates, networks, and benefits are as consumer-friendly as possible. The exchange is also the only one in the country that requires all health plans to be standardized. 11 insurers are offering plans for 2018, and will continue to do so in 2019. The cost of CSR has been added to on-exchange silver plans. California has opted to keep open enrollment at three months in duration going forward.
    Michael Rickard
  • Short-term health insurance in Delaware October 15, 2018 5:04 am
    Delaware does not have state-specific regulations for short-term health insurance plans, so the state defaults to the federal regulations.
    Steve Anderson
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